It’s Friday! That means later this evening I’ll be hauling out the medical supplies and chillin with some needles in my thighs–it’s IG infusion night!

First, to start with I’ll back track a little bit with an update on the whole gallbladder drama–because I know my dozen of blood-related readers world wide are simply on the edge of their seats. I met with the surgeon yesterday and he confirmed it–the gallbladder must go. He explained the operation very well, despite the fact he was obviously on auto-pilot. I’m pretty sure he was thinking more about what he was going to have for lunch than the explanation he was giving me; he says he does about 100 of these a year, so I can hardly blame him. This is my very first one and even I was thinking about lunch! Food-related day dreams aside though, we got through the appointment and I am officially scheduled to be separated from my gallbladder on June 2nd. Sorry to break it off gb, but if it’s any consolation–it’s definitely you, not me.

Now that I am done conversing with my own organ like a lunatic, we can talk about way cooler stuff–namely IG infusions! Seriously, no matter how much I dislike sticking myself with needles and having golf ball sized lumps on my person, the inherent coolness of what I’m doing never escapes me. Not to mention how much better these nifty weekly infusions make my life. Roughly 98.73% better. Roughly.

Obviously I love my infusions, and will therefore write about them repeatedly, so today we’ll stick to the basics: IG stands for immune globulin. Healthy people donate plasma and the immune globulins are separated out. Each time I infuse a dose of Gammagard, I receive antibodies pooled from about 10,000-50,000 plasma donors, so I can get the broadest range of coverage possible. See how neat this is?

I do my infusions subcutaneously, meaning the medicine is injected just under the skin and is slowly absorbed through the fat. My infusions are done weekly, though some forms of SCIG can be done every other week. IG infusions can also be done by IV–directly into the vein–once a month. I’ve tried them all, but the weekly SCIG infusions work best for me in terms of infection prevention and how I tolerate the infusions themselves; typically, SCIG infusions have much less severe side effects than IV infusions. Plus, I can do SCIG infusions by myself at home, while a nurse is required to administer the IV infusions. Some might not like doing it themselves, but I like getting to be the one in control and having greater flexibility in scheduling, etc. Not to mention sitting on my own couch, watching Harry Potter for the 100th time and snacking on something yummy is approximately way more fun than spendings hours in a hospital infusion center.

So enough words. Here are some pictures.

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After an infusion in my tummy–yes those are flying pig pjs. They are the coolest.

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Needle in my front thigh

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Everything prepped and ready to go

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Infusion set up at home

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Me pulling the Gammagard into the syringe