Last week I celebrated my 23rd birthday, which is hard to believe I know. The day before my birthday marked five years exactly since I had my first Ig infusion.

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I was diagnosed with a primary immunodeficiency towards the end of my senior year of high school, after many years of sickness, infections, tests and endless doctor’s appointments. As I think is typical, it took a while to get insurance approval for infusions and get set up with the specialty pharmacy.

Finally on June 17th 2013 an infusion nurse came to my home and gave me my first dose of IVIG. The next day I turned 18, and the day after that I graduated from high school. Before heading out to school that fall I started self-administered sub-q infusions. And now five years later here I am.

When I was diagnosed and told about Ig infusions I was excited, I was hopeful, but I didn’t know what to expect and honestly did not expect them to be as life changing as they have been. That first year I was on infusions I went almost an entire year without an infection; before I started them infections were almost constant. Since then other bodily incompetencies have brought me down a bit, but the infusions still help tremendously. ms-95DmfR

At some points over the last five years the realization that these infusions are life long
has been daunting. Sometimes on infusion night I’ll drag my feet. I’ll think, I just really don’t feel like doing this today. Then the thought that when I’m 30, 50, 70, 90–I’ll still be
doing these infusions, well that’s a bit of an exhausting thought.

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But the truth is, it’s just part of my life now. And man I am so grateful for that. It’s hard to believe I’ve been doing them for five years already. It’s gone by fast. Week by week, month by month, and suddenly five years have gone by. And though they’ve certainly had their rough spots, it’s been a great five years.

I look forward to the next 60-70ish years with my infusions–til death do us part.