Skip to content

How to Hydrate for Your Ig Infusion

Hydration is key for Ig infusions, whether you’re doing IVIG of SCIG. I’ve learned this the hard way over the years. Once, I didn’t hydrate well enough before IVIG and my blood pressure plummeted so badly in response to the medicine that I almost ended up going for a ride in an ambulance. Now I do Subq infusions and while I don’t have the same problems with blood pressure taking a vacation, if I don’t hydrate extremely well before and during the infusion I get a serious migraine. So let’s compare some of the top hydration drinks with infusion prep in mind.

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 5.49.36 PM

After a couple years of experimentation my favorite is Low Calorie Gatorade. I like Sugar Free Powerade, but it doesn’t taste as good and the artificial sweetener tends to give me a headache. Pedialyte is my second go-to, but it definitely doesn’t taste as good as Gatorade. Each person is different so you’ll have to do some of your own experimenting. Happy hydrating!

A Day in the Life of this Zebra

Something kind of surprising that I’ve had several people tell me since I started this blog is that it has been “eye opening.” I guess that’s strange to me because, well, it’s nothing new for me. I sometimes forget that I’m a zebra living in a world of horses; when I hear other students talking about their Friday night plans I automatically think “Sillys. They’re forgetting that it’s infusion night tonight;” when I spend all of my breaks bouncing between doctors appointments, I forget that, that’s not the purpose of school breaks for everyone. Some people can’t imagine what it is like to have a malfunctioning immune system or a head that is always hurting–I can’t imagine what life would be like without them. So whether you’re a horse wondering how a zebra spends her days, or a zebra wondering if you’re the only one, here’s a day in the life of this zebra. (This is a Monday from a couple of weeks ago, but still overall a pretty good representation of an average day)

Monday 8:30 am

I wake up even though my first class isn’t til 10:00. I don’t like having to rush in the morning.

I start my day with cranberry juice and emergen-c. Mostly to prevent UTIs but also just as an immune booster. Then I get dressed (with thermals underneath my clothes because I’m already that cold), etc. and have breakfast.

9:50 am

I’m off to Fundamentals of Creative Writing. Today we are workshoping our poem #2 for our poetry portfolio. Maybe I’ll let you guys see it once I’ve revised.

11:00 am

Creative Writing is over. Normally I’d be heading home but instead I have to go make up the French test I missed on Friday because I had a bad migraine.

12:00 pm

image

Home again home again. If niece number two isn’t already asleep then I’ll probably sitdown to do a nap time with her. Nap time with this aunty means we snuggle on the couch watching simple songs on YouTube until she falls asleep. Then I either do homework or also fall asleep.

1:00 pm

Nap time is over. I’ll grab a quick lunch and then head off to French.

1:30 pm

French. We’re starting a new chapter today. I’ll also find out how I did on the test. I hope I did ok–it was hard studying this weekend with a migraine/migraine hangover. (I missed one question, but all things considered I’ll take that quite happily).

2:30 pm

French is fini and now I’m off to Approaches to Literature. We just finished reading the Tempest. Now I think we will be writing a paper about it. Woot woot.

3:30 pm

Done with classes for the day! I head home and change into sweatpants and a hoodie. I sit down to steam and watch Netflix for a bit. Probably the Great British Baking Show since they just put up a new season. Steaming helps prevent sinus infections and also seems to help ease the aching of my head/face.

4:15 pm

Now that I’ve taken a break it’s time to get down to business, as it were. Let’s see what should I start with? Probably the essay for WWI Lit that’s due tomorrow that I haven’t started…

5:00 pm

Been working for 45 minutes, made decent progress. I deserve a break. So I go out to the living room to see the girlies for a minute.

5:15 pm

Ok back to work. I can do this. I want to finish the rough draft so I don’t have that much to do tomorrow, though it’s not due til midnight.

7:00 pm

Whether or not the rough draft is finished, I can’t think in cohesive sentences anymore. Time for a dinner break.

7:30 pm

For niece number one it’s time for a pre-bedtime breakdown. For me it’s time to choose which is more important– my French hw or finishing my WWI Lit reading for tomorrow. I think I’ll go for the reading. Takes less brain power and by this point my head is hurting at least medium from looking at a screen for so long writing the essay. So I get comfy and dive into All Quiet on the Western Front.

8:15-8:30ish pm

Either I’m finished with the reading or my brain is finished for the day–either way it’s time for some healthy hot cocoa (raw cocoa powder, honey, cinnamon, turmeric, pink salt and a touch of grass fed butter) and an episode of Stranger Things. My sibs have already finished the new season but they’re watching it again with me so I can get caught up. I only have two episodes left!

9:15ish pm

The first episode is over. Now I have to use all my willpower to tear myself away in the 15 seconds before Netflix starts the next one and I’m committed to another 45 minutes. Time to hop in the shower.

9:45ish pm

Shower done. Now time to clean out my sinuses with the neti pot thing and do my nightly stretching. As you can see I spend a decent amount of time each day just trying to prevent sinus infections, which are my bane.

10:15 pm

Take melatonin. Read. Pray. Brush teeth, etc. Fill up humidifier for the night. Set alarm for tomorrow. Take cough medicine. Rub Vicks vapor rub on chest (been doing the last two ever since I got whooping cough in Sept). Lights out by 11:30.

 

16 Again: Chronic Migraine Diagnosis as a Teen

Migraines in kids and teens are more common than you think, but they rarely look like they do in adults. I started having migraines when I was 16 and it took a while for them to figure out what was going on. What’s more, a lot of the drugs used to treat and prevent migraines in adults aren’t considered safe for children and adolescents, so treatment options are limited.

I can’t remember exactly how or when my migraines started. I just remember, somewhere in the fall of my junior year of high school, suddenly becoming a walking headache. I also started having severe insomnia, which only fed my migraines. At the time I was seeing an orthopedic specialist at CHKD for a back injury, and I mentioned once to him about my head hurting all the time. After ruling out a concussion, I was sent to a pediatric neurologist.

After a thorough evaluation by the ped neuro, I was sent home with a diagnosis of chronic migraine and a script for Topomax, as well as something to help me sleep. When the doc first said “migraine” I thought he was off his rocker. My head hurt, yes. It hurt bad. It hurt bad all the time. But I always thought a migraine could only be an unbearably painful headache that came along with nausea, vomiting and dizziness. I thought he must be wrong–my headaches are bad but they aren’t that bad.

Well I started Topomax as the doc instructed. It helped my headaches but it was a steep price to pay. I was always so sleepy and struggled to keep my head up in class. I started having a hard time with concentration and memory that I had never had before. My grades dropped. My bones became more brittle and I repeatedly broke fingers playing basketball. I even had kidney stones once. At the time I had no idea that Topomax was causing all of these problems; I was on it for nearly two years. When I came off of it because my headaches were doing better, it was like coming inside after being out in the dark for hours. I hadn’t even realized how miserable I was, or what was causing that misery, until I was able to step away from it.

After I realized what Topomax had been doing to me, I was super mad at the doc for putting me on it in the first place, but now I understand why he did. There are so very, very few drug options that are considered safe for those under 18 to use. The meds I’m on now for my migraines, for example–none of them are approved for use in under-eighteens. Still, there are treatment options available, and when all’s said and done I think being on something like Topomax is much better than getting no help at all.

To help us better understand the types of migraines and similar headache disorders found in children, their symptoms and their treatment options, the Diamond Headache Clinic has made this neat presentation and been kind enough to share:

Screen Shot 2017-11-27 at 12.55.53 PM

Diamond Headache Clinic

A Nightly Stretching Routine for Less Pain and Stiffness in the Morning

Ok people are you ready for this? Today I’m going to share with you my nightly stretching routine. A combo of yoga and physical therapy stretches, it’s taken me years to hone to perfection. I do it every night before I go to bed; it helps me sleep better (less pain at night) and keeps the morning stiffness and pain under control.

1) Standing calf stretch

Hold 30 secs.

Hold 30 seconds each leg straight and repeat on each side with leg slightly bent. I do it with my torso leaning against a wall/ my bed to deepen the stretch. IMG_0040

2) Standing Groin Stretch

Hold 30 secs each leg.

IMG_0041.JPG Again this can be done leaning against something to take some of the weight off of the bent leg if needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) Standing Quad Stretch

Hold 30 secs each leg.

Grab hold of something to help you keep your balance if needed, but try to work up to balancing on your own.IMG_0042.PNG

4) Standing Hamstring Stretch

Holds 60 secs.

Yeah I know you won’t look like this at first–but eventually. IMG_0043

5) Standing IT Band Stretch

Hold 30 secs each leg.

IMG_0044.GIF

6) Sitting Hamstring Stretch

Hold 60 secs.

IMG_0045.JPG

7) Sitting Groin Stretch

Hold 30 secs.

IMG_0046

8) Side Sitting Hamstring/Back Stretch

Hold 45 secs each side.

IMG_0047

9) Figure Four Stretch

Hold 60 secs each side.

IMG_0048

 

10) Downward Facing Dog

Hold 30 secs.

IMG_0049

11) Upward Facing Dog

Hold 30 secs.

IMG_0050

12) Child’s Pose

Hold 30-60 secs.

IMG_0051

13) Cat Cow

Go back and forth for about 30 secs, bend up into cat with exhale, go down into cow with inhale.

IMG_0052

14) Gluteus Medius Stretch

Hold 60 secs each side.

IMG_0053.JPG

15) Kneeling Quad/Hip Stretch

Hold 30 secs each side. You should feel the stretch in you quad and hip flexors.

IMG_0054.JPG

16) Low Lunge

Hold 30 secs each side. Then lower back knee and repeat.

 

17) Forward Fold

Bend knees slightly and let head hang. Hold for 30-60 secs.

IMG_0058

 

All done! I know it seems like a lot but it only takes about 20 minutes once you get the sequence down. Sweet dreams and less painful mornings!

15 Shows Worthy of Sick Day Binge-Watching

Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t really fun being stuck sick at home–especially if it happens frequently. Here are fifteen of my favorite shows that help me get through sick days.

PsychIMG_0037

Psych is the best. A mixture of clever crime solving and ridiculous antics, it just about broke my heart when they took Psych off Netflix. No it did break my heart.

 

Bones

Granted this might not be a great one if you’re feeling squeamish, but there’s nothing like Bones to make a day fly by. In fact, Bones got me through my gallbladder surgery recovery this summer.

IMG_0038.GIF

 

Leverage

I’m not sure if Leverage is on Netflix anymore but if it is, it is definitely worth spending a sick day or five on. It combines the smoothness of White Collar with the ridiculousness of Psych.

 

Everybody Loves Raymond

An oldy but a goody– Everybody Loves Raymond got me through my sinus surgery recovery.

 

Parks and Recreation

IMG_0036I was first introduced to Parks and Rec just over a year ago and since then I have watched it and rewatched it and rewatched it again. My sisters and I basically communicate via P&R quotes now. It’s so funny it might just heal you.

 

 

The Office

Also heartwarming and hilarious, The Office is a fool-proof choice. Though some of the episodes are just too hard to watch because Michael is so embarrassing.IMG_0033.GIF

 

The Good Place

The Good Place is a new favorite; it’s goofy, ridiculous and hilarious just for the sake of it–so basically it’s the best. As of about a month ago when we discovered it, The Good Place has become the official Friday-night-infusion show.

 

White CollarIMG_0032

Clever crime solving + humour + Neal Caffrey’s face = you can’t lose with this one. I
watched White Collar when I was at my sickest with gastroparesis.

 

Hawaii Five-0

I started watching this show because of the pretty views of Hawaii, but I soon got sucked into it hardcore. It has made me second-guess my desire to visit Hawaii though–there’s an awful lot of crime. Especially terrorist plots it would seem.

 

Studio C

Studio C is a sketch comedy show on BYU TV. If you have a pretty goofy funny-bone then you’ll get a lot of good laughs from Studio C.

 

Downton Abbey

If you love zombie apocalypse shows, then Downton Abbey is for you. But really I got into Downton recently because I’m taking WWI Lit and Downton is one of the few shows/movies that covers the WWI time period. It’s super interesting historically–like looking at animals in a zoo. Plus Cousin Violet aka Mcgoncall is hilarious and profound at the same time.IMG_0031.GIF

 

Gilmore Girls

I have to admit Gilmore Girls is a hard one for me. I was watching it when I first got sick with gastroparesis and so it is tied to some rather unpleasant memories. Still, it is undeniably awesome, funny and there’s like a gillion seasons (plus the reboot show).

 

Sherlock

I once thought that there could be no better casting for Sherlock Holmes than RDJ, but IMG_0030.GIFthen Benedict Cumerbatch came along and changed my mind. Sherlock is cerebral, intense and funny (sometimes). Unfortunately it’s produced at a rate of about three episodes every three years–but don’t worry it is a British show so each episode is like a mini movie.

 

The Great British Baking Show

Ok don’t laugh. I am not British, nor do I particularly like to bake, but I love this show. British baking traditions are so different than American ones, it’s super interesting. Plus it’s a nice change from American baking/cooking contest where everyone is so brutal–The British Baking Show is competitive, but not contentious. Also for some unknown reason this was my niece Aiva’s favorite show when she was 3-5 months old. So funny.

 

Once Upon a Time

Ok so good old Once has gotten weird lately. I stopped watching a couple seasons ago. BUT the first few seasons were really good and still worth a sick day watch. The clever twist on classic fairy tales is fun and makes you a little nostalgic.

IMG_0029.GIF

How to Help a Loved One with Whooping Cough (As Told by a Two-Year-Old)

I’ve been coughing for about six weeks now and in that time my two year old niece (who I live with) has developed a fool-proof treatment plan for Aunty’s whooping cough.

Treatment 1: Back PatsIMG_0027

The first and most important part of treating a loved one’s whooping cough is to always be on hand to pat them on the back while they cough. This means constant vigilance–you must always be listening and prepared to run as fast as you can to them whenever you hear coughing. Additionally, you must tailor the intensity of your back pats to the intensity of their coughing– if they are only coughing a little than a gentle, slow pat will do, but if they are coughing very hard you will need to hit their back much faster and really throw your weight into each one. Finally, if they are somewhere you cannot reach them, say in the bathroom, and you hear them coughing it is perfectly suitable to freak out and expect something horrible will happen because you are unable to pat their back as they cough.

Treatment 2: Keep Vomit Bags on Hand

As I have said before, hospital vomit bags have been super handy for catching whatever comes up during a coughing fit. Your role as a loved one then, is to always make sure their bag is right by them. If they leave it in their room and are watching tv in the living room, you must go and get it for them. If they leave it on the floor and they are on the couch, you must hand it to them. It is also important to note that in order to make them feel less gross about carrying around a vomit bag, you should probably come up with another name for it such as “yucky baba.”

IMG_0380

A yucky baba

 

Treatment 3: Bear Hugs

IMG_0026This past Thursday I had the worst coughing fit I’ve had yet. I guess good old pertussis wanted to prove it still had some power of misery over me. To make it worse, the whole choking, gasping, vomiting repeatedly thing happened right in front of my niece. She was super worried about me and didn’t understand why her mom kept taking her out of the room. As I sat on the floor catching my breath afterwards she escaped from her mom and came barreling into my room to give me a high-velocity bear hug. And let me tell you, being love-tackled by thirty compact pounds of adorable did make me feel rather better.

Treatment 4: Share your Toys

Later that same day I was sitting on my bed watching Downton Abbey–still recovering from that horrible fit– when my niece broke into my room again. She walked up to my bed matter-of-factly holding her little wooden camel in one hand and her little wooden rooster… between her teeth. She placed first the camel, then the slobbery rooster into my hand and climbed up to sit on the bed with me. So you see the key here is 1) share your toys, 2) the more slobbery they are the more love bestowed, and 3) just be there for them.

IMG_0385

Well there you have it, four ways you can take care of a loved one with whooping cough!ms-F7fOC7

It’ll Pass

One of my favorite book series is Anne of Green Gables. In one of the later books after Anne is married she befriends the old sailor Captain Jim that runs the local lighthouse. Captain Jim is a lovably simple fella, but sometimes he says things deeply profound. One of those quotes, which I am sure I will butcher, has stuck with me and always comes to mind on particularly rough days. He said something along the lines of “Even on those days when I’m hurtin real bad I feel sorta cheerful cus I know sooner or later it’ll pass.”

Sooner or later it’ll pass.

Captain Jim would know–he weathered plenty of storms in his time as a sailor.

So far in my life I’ve always found this to be true. All the pain I’ve felt–migraines, broken bones, surgeries, sprains, strains, infections, gallbladder attacks, unbearable cramps, gastroparesis, depression–no matter what the pain or the cause of it, always it has passed.

Sometimes in the moment of extreme pain you can’t imagine it ever will. It seems it will last forever–that there never has been and never will be anything except this all-encompassing pain. Hundreds of times I’ve felt like I couldn’t make it til it passed, I couldn’t handle one more second of pain. Somehow I always did. Always do. And then eventually it always eases. Always passes.

I’ve been thinking about that with this cough. I’ve already been sick for more than a month. It seems so long and yet it could last for much longer still.

At the absolute worst point–when the coughing fits came about 40-50 times a day and each one left me gasping, choking, crying and each cough was agony to my ribs–I felt then I couldn’t handle it. Each time I felt like I couldn’t take even one more coughing fit. I wondered how I was supposed to keep going with my classes–or at all really. Each of the jabillion times I woke up in the night to cough and choke and choke and cough one thought kept going through my mind. This Sucks.

But each time I handled just one more coughing fit. One more day. One more night.

And then this past week something awesome happened. All the sudden it started to ease. Coughing fits were less intense. I stopped needing my handy vomit bags so much. I felt like eating more (something about regularly coughing up part of whatever you last ate makes it not very appealing…). Then coughing fits came less frequently. Somehow by the middle of the week I could go an hour, or two even without a single fit! Suddenly I could go to all of my classes and it was hard, but doable. Without even realizing it at first I had made it through the worst and it started to ease.

Believe it or not, it looks like even whooping cough passes. And it might even do so before the hundred day mark!

So head up, feet forward and be a little cheerful, cus sooner or later it’ll pass.

A Baby Disease Busted My Rib

Ok so remember how I said I had a bad case of bronchitis and then disappeared a couple weeks ago? Well it turns out I did not have bronchitis. I do almost definitely have whooping cough.

Technically the swab results from my seven hour stop off at the ER this past Wednesday

IMG_0379

A rare action shot of an ER patient hoping that the footsteps she hears is someone coming to tell her something useful. Also yes I’m doing hw. French.

haven’t come back yet, but my symptoms are dead on AND there has been a verified case of whooping cough at my school. Add to that my incompetent immune system that doesn’t gain immunity from vacccines annndddd. Boom. You’ve got a twenty-two-year-old with a full-blown case of whooping cough.

From the very first week of school there’s been a bad “cold” going around. I’m thinking that really, most people have had a watered-down case of whooping cough. But luckily for me, other zebras and new-borns, you don’t need to have a full case of whooping cough to give the full-blown thing to someone else.

So what does a full-blown case of whooping cough look like in an adult?

Well first you get a “cold.” It’s really not even that bad of a cold. Then after about a week you start getting a nagging cough. That gets worse for a couple weeks until you find yourself having anywhere from 15-50 coughing fits a day that are so intense you throw up and gasp for air as seemingly infinite amounts of sticky mucus obscure your airways. (In my case the very worst of the attacks only lasted for a little over a week.) Then things get just a little better. Your coughing fits are less frequent. You aren’t choking, gasping and throwing up quite so much when you cough. You stop feeling like you’re going to black out with each coughing fit. That’s where I’m at now. Apparently this bit can last anywhere from 2-10 weeks.

Oh yeah and I forgot to mention–you might cough so hard that you break, bruise or dislocate a rib or so. It freakin hurts, but don’t worry there’s not much they can do about it.

That’s maybe the worst thing about whooping cough–there’s almost nothing that can be done. If caught early enough a course of antibiotics can lessen the severity of the case, but otherwise you basically just have to ride it out.

In China whooping cough is known as the 100 days cough, because it often lasts for three months or longer. So I pulled out my calendar and counted 100 days from the day I got sick. According to Chinese tradition I should be better by December 19th, give or take a few days. I have no idea why I thought that would help. I guess I can start a count down or something. At this point I’m at least a month in so… only 70 more days to go!

This is definitely not how I wanted to start off the semester. Or finish it… But it is what it is. It’s not going to make for the smoothest semester, that’s for sure, but I’ll do my best. And that includes making a sincere effort not to vomit or pass out in class 😉

IMG_0380

We swiped a bunch of the ER vomit bags so we could feel like our trip hadn’t been a total waste. I carry one around everywhere to catch whatever comes up during a coughing fit.

IMG_0363

Doing the nebulizer. This thing is almost as old as I am and it’s still kickin! We call it the Darth Vader machine.

Trolls, Molds and Woman Colds

Well that title is fairly self-explanatory I think. So see you next week.

Just yankin your chain.

This week can be somewhat appropriately represented by these three nouns.

First, Trolls. 

IMG_0010

You know what hugs are great for? Sharing germs. Way to go Poppy.

My oldest niece is currently going through a Trolls phase. At least twice a day she asks for “Everybody oh oh oh.” Since she is not quite two, I can understand why the bright, song-filled movie is appealing to her. In fact, the adults of the house have agreed that the movie was either designed by a think-tank of five-year-olds, or the people who made it were crazy high the whole time. Either way I think we are all excited for this phase to be over.

Second, Molds.

I’ve been getting allergy shots for my new-found mold allergy for over a month now. I do feel that they are already starting to help–I have been sinus-infection-free since July despite the very wet September we are having (molds love the rain). The only downside to the shots is that they tend to trigger migraines. In the long run this may be a good thing, as that suggests that mold is a big migraine trigger for me right now; once I get the allergy under control my migraines will likely improve. For right now though, it does make shot day a tad tricky.

Third, Woman Colds.

The Woman Cold is a term I have decided on to describe a phenomenon as real and as ancient as The Man Cold. The Woman Cold, like it’s masculine counterpart, can of course be experienced by either sex. Its name is simply an acknowledgement that the majority of its sufferers are women.

The Woman Cold refers to a cold/illness that the sufferer chooses to ignore and remain in

IMG_0013.GIF

Ron with his Woman Cold

denial about until something drastic happens. The owner of The Woman Cold will continue with life as normal, steadfastly insisting that “it’s not that bad” until they either recover or get much, much sicker.

This week I had a Woman Cold. There’s been a cold going around campus and I finally succumbed. Really, as far as the cold itself goes, it was nothing to write home about. The cold was not the primary problem though–the whole week my chest was getting tighter, I was coughing a little, then a lot, then A LOT.

Just part of the little, trifling cold I was sure. It will pass.

Eh. Wrong.

Friday morning I came back from my morning class. I set my backpack on the floor of my room. I bent over to retrieve my phone from its depths. Suddenly I was seized by an intense coughing fit that led me to discover this equation:

Intense coughing + bent over Miranda = throw up on my poor backpack.

Oops.

Now I really, really didn’t want to throw up on someone else’s backpack, so I finally accepted that it was time to stay home from class. My Woman Cold had sneakily metamorphosized into bronchitis.

Actually, as I have already mentioned, this development wasn’t sneaky at all, but as a fundamental part of The Woman Cold is denial, virtually every outcome except full recovery comes as a surprise to the sufferer.

IMG_0012

And don’t think for a second I’m saying that The Woman Cold is a good thing–if many of my professors and classmates hadn’t come down with this particular branch of the cold then I probably wouldn’t have gotten it. They were in denial, they came to class sick, they got other people sick and that ultimately led to me getting bronchitis. The Woman Cold is just as annoying and foolish as the man one. Well almost.

 

 

I Earned My Stripes with a New Zebra Record (Or Two)

Friday at , at long last, I got my Ig meds and was able to do an infusion. It had been exactly three weeks since my last infusion, beating out my previous record of time-without-an-infusion (since I’ve started infusions that is) by several days. It’s been a long three weeks.

IMG_0333

Had to celebrate the end of the nightmare with some Fro Yo!

Amazingly, I did not get seriously sick or get an infection this time. My previous record of two-and-a-half weeks without an infusion got me a horrible gi infection and a partially paralyzed stomach. So my family and I had good reason to be a bit worried this time, but even with classes starting and sickness already going around campus I managed to avoid any great catastrophe…

Friday night I actually set another record–the longest it has ever taken me to do a sub-q infusion. It was my first infusion of Gamunex-C (I had been on Gammagard, Aetna made me switch).

At the historic event Thursday of at last being able to set up my shipment, the nurse informed me that the rate tubing I’ve been using with Gammagard is off-label for Gamunex and so I have to use a different tubing and discard my old ones (I got to be honest this is very unlikely to happen). If you’re wondering what the difference between F900 rate tubing and 120 rate tubing is, it’s just a difference of about six inches and 2 hours. Normally I infuse (or did infuse) two 50ml syringes and each syringe takes about 30 minutes. Add in a short break in between syringes to discourage leaking and my entire infusion took 1.5 hours (not counting set up). Friday it took 1.5 hours PER SYRINGE. If you’re keeping up with my extremely complicated math, you’ll know that means it took 3 hours to infuse Friday!

Now I know what you’re thinking–shouldn’t I just be grateful to have anything to infuse? Well I am. I super duper am. But nonetheless I feel it necessary to be true to human nature and find SOMETHING to whine about, no matter how small.

How long it took is really my only complaint with the new med. Well that and I had the exact same side effects from Gamunex that I had when I infused Gammagard at twice the rate. Otherwise the only thing wrong with Gamunex-C is that it is a change–a change from a med I was very happy on and a routine I was accustomed to. But oh well. Life goes on.

IMG_0329

The new med!

1 2 5