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The Chocolate Chest Theory

Today is a perfect day to talk about chocolate. Why? Well isn’t every day?

We Macfarlanes take our chocolate seriously. Two of my dad’s great loves are chocolate and wood working, so a couple years ago he decided to combine the two and make himself a “chocolate chest.” When he first told me the purpose of this chest he was making I thought he was joking–he was not.

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The Chocolate Chest

I consider myself to be an authority on very little, but my life thus far has given me reasonable education in at least two categories: chocolate and chronic illness. Both of them are apart of my daily life. Both of them, one might even argue, are written in my genetics.

So I decided to follow dear-old-dad’s example and combine these two faucets of my life into one. The product: The Chocolate Chest Theory.

If you have a chronic illness you’ve probably heard of The Spoon Theory–it explains the limited energy/strength a person with chronic illness has to work with each day (if you haven’t heard of it I encourage you to look it up).

The Chocolate Chest Theory is like that, except tastier.

Let’s say everyone has a chocolate chest. The chocolate in there is your energy for the week. A typical chocolate chest looks like this at the beginning of the week:

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All that chocolate you get all to yourself–more than enough most of the time right?

Well a person with chronic illness is like my pops–they don’t get the chocolate all to themselves. Each illness is like one of dad’s chocolate-loving children and grandchildren–they (we) eat away most of the chocolate before he can even get to it! So instead of starting the week off with a nice full store of strength, a person with chronic illness opens their chocolate chest Monday morning to find something more like this:

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Not only is there barely even any chocolate, but it’s mostly the gross stuff like baking chocolate or *gag* white chocolate. That’s all the strength and energy a person with chronic illness has to work with for the entire week. Because our illnesses eat away so much of our chocolate, we have to be very careful how we use what is left to us.

In my own life I spend almost all my chocolate on being a full-time student. Then if there’s anything left it is reserved for church, family and exercise. When I’m asked about extracurricular activities I participate in, I laugh. Extracurricular? Extra? Ain’t nobody got chocolate for that!