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Mom and Me Freezing for a HIDA

Yesterday I had my HIDA Scan. Apparently Nuclear Imaging technology can only be operated at arctic temperatures. For someone who is constantly cold in anything less than eighty degree weather (me) this easily overlooked aspect of the test was by far the most trying. It took most of the car ride home in a sun-baked car for mother dear and me to thaw.

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When I scheduled my scan they emphasized that I had to have another person there to drive me home. I did not understand why until an hour into the scan. The timer on the machine went off and the nurse walked in announcing “no gallbladder.” She told me to get up and move around for a bit and we’d try again, but if that little bugger was still hiding she’d have to give me…morphine! Suddenly the necessity of a driver made complete sense. I guess the morphine makes it easier to see the gallbladder- I’m not sure how. Luckily I didn’t have to find out because after a few minutes of pacing back and forth and doing the well known gallbladder-get-your-crap-together dance-chant combo, the tiny organ finally deigned to make an appearance. So no morphine for me. The rational part of me was extremely grateful, but my curious side was a little disappointed. I doubt–or that is I hope–I will not have a reason to be administered morphine again in my lifetime. It would have been an interesting experience to say the least.

Other than that small hiccup, my scan was by and large uneventful. I got in at 7:30 am and I walked blinking, frozen and stiff, but otherwise unharmed, into the welcome sunlight just after 10:30 am. So yeah, it took forever. Or three hours. The two are basically the same when you’re starving, thirsty  (I had to fast for it) and freezing. Still, if you have to get a HIDA scan, don’t sweat. It’s not fun, but there are definitely worse things out there–like math. Math is the worst.

fyzODLrZORdUAPlus as it turns out, the scan, unlike math, can be very useful. Mine showed that my gallbladder is functioning at 25% where the low-normal is 35%. So now I get to go talk to a surgeon Thursday about cutting the sucker out! I know surgery is never fun, but when I’m in the middle of a gallbladder “attack” there is nothing in this world I wouldn’t do to ease the pain. So all in all, I’m thrilled. For once, my body is misbehaving in a straightforward manner. Way to go body. You finally did something wrong, right.

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How to Start?…Jump Right in I Guess

I have been trying to get this blog started all year, but a combination of school, sicknesses and just normal life stuff kept me struggling to stay afloat. Body, mind and grades having survived finals- just barely I might add- I am now ready to finally get to write something that is not a paper.

Perhaps the most challenging aspect of finals this semester surfaced in a trip to the ER one Sunday evening two weeks before they began. For the past year or so I’ve been experiencing weird “attacks” of severe abdominal pain that for the longest time I believed to be gas pain. Well naturally, my body decided to hop on the crazy train that is the final weeks of a semester and the attacks suddenly became much worse and much more frequent. This culminated in me laying on my bedroom floor, using my cell phone to call my brother- who was downstairs- to come help me after about an hour of some of the worst pain I have ever experienced in my life. Poor guy. Mysterious medical emergencies are not part of the typical brotherly responsibilities, but he handled it like a champ. To make matters worse, my blood pressure had gone all funky because of the pain–I almost passed out when I tried to sit up, so brother dear had to carry me to the car. I suppose it’s lucky for both of us that he is my bigger brother in more ways than age alone.

The ER, was just about as helpful as usual. That is to say they gave me some pain medicine and a saline IV for the bp, made sure I wasn’t dying right that second and sent me on my merry way. Pretty typical. I generally avoid the ER at all costs, but the look on my brothers face when he found me pale and sweaty on the floor encouraged me to accept his proposition of a trip to the hospital.

A follow up with a GI (gastroenterologist) and an abdominal ultrasound later the finish line on this one still looks to be in the distance. On the ultrasound they found gallstones in my gallbladder, but my doc is convinced that they are not the problem because I am a far cry from the typical gallstone patient (Fat, Forty, Female, Fertile). So now I am waiting to get scheduled for a HIDA scan, which looks at the functioning of the liver, gallbladder, etc. I’d like to say it’s the first time I’ve laid on a table for hours while a machine followed radioactive material through my body, but I cannot. While it’s not painful, it certainly is a pain- it takes forever, it’s boring, cold (but to be fair that is my usual state), and you have to fast for it, which is fun. Oh well, as the weird crab thing in Moana sings ,”c’est la vie, mon ami.” (That’s life my friend)

So there you go. I guess you could say I’m starting my blog En Medias Res, which as I recently learned and will soon forget, is a convention of epic literature, meaning they start in the middle. So I guess that automatically qualifies my life as epic. I knew it.